Creative Aging

Rhode Island Forms Arts & Health Advisory Group

On June 14, RI Teaching Artists Center re-launched the Arts & Health Advisory Group, in partnership with the RI Department of Health and the RI State Council on the Arts.   The purpose of this policy initiative is to promote understanding of the powerful role the arts can play in health and healing, and to expand the engagement of the arts in health.   Twenty-four people from the healthcare and arts sectors gathered at the RI Department of Health.  The group includes doctors, nurses, health sector administrators and program directors, artists who teach in healthcare programs and settings, RI State Council on the Arts’ Education program staff, the Project Director from the RI Teaching Artists Center, and the Chief Administrative Director of the RI  Department of Health. The group examined Department of Health initiatives just starting or currently underway, and the role the arts may play in those initiatives.  

First, Health Equity Zones, building healthy communities on the local level, is already including plans for the arts and teaching artists in two zones.   Secondly, the initiative to certify community health workers (non-medical personnel who support community health) was explored as a possible role for teaching artists to play as the role of the community health worker is legitimized.  Lastly, surveys will be sent to a variety of license groups in the health sector to gather baseline information about the use of the arts in healthcare settings.  The DOH will include an arts question in selected surveys they are sending this summer, and a longer survey will be sent to other organizations using the DOH databases and survey design assistance. There was also beginning conversation about new initiatives that may be developed.  Stay tuned as the work of this RITAC policy group continues. 

 

NEA webinar showcases new report on creativity and aging

 

NEA webinar showcases new report on creativity and aging

 

Live, public webinar on Wednesday, February 3, 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. EST

 

More than 10,000 baby boomers are turning 65 every day, and the fastest growing demographic in the U.S. is women over age 85. What role can the arts play in ensuring healthy aging for this growing population?  Learn more at the February 3 webinar, which introduces a white paper of recommendations from the May 2015 Summit on Creativity and Aging in America, a convening of more than 70 experts hosted by the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Center for Creative Aging.  An archived version will be available at arts.gov.

 

The paper highlights recommendations on healthy aging, lifelong learning in the arts, and age-friendly community design.  The summit was a precursor to the 2015 White House Conference on Aging, which addressed four major issues: retirement security, long-term services and supports, healthy aging, and elder abuse. The webinar will cover the main findings from the summit, including opportunities to use the arts to help develop vibrant, healthy communities and services for older adults.

 

Speakers:

 

·         Beth Bienvenu, Accessibility Director, National Endowment for the Arts, will moderate the webinar

·         Gay Hanna, Executive Director, National Center for Creative Aging

·         Nora Super, Director, 2015 White House Conference on Aging

Live, public webinar on Wednesday, February 3, 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. EST

 

More than 10,000 baby boomers are turning 65 every day, and the fastest growing demographic in the U.S. is women over age 85. What role can the arts play in ensuring healthy aging for this growing population?  Learn more at the February 3 webinar, which introduces a white paper of recommendations from the May 2015 Summit on Creativity and Aging in America, a convening of more than 70 experts hosted by the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Center for Creative Aging.  An archived version will be available at arts.gov.

 

The paper highlights recommendations on healthy aging, lifelong learning in the arts, and age-friendly community design.  The summit was a precursor to the 2015 White House Conference on Aging, which addressed four major issues: retirement security, long-term services and supports, healthy aging, and elder abuse. The webinar will cover the main findings from the summit, including opportunities to use the arts to help develop vibrant, healthy communities and services for older adults.

Speakers:

 

·         Beth Bienvenu, Accessibility Director, National Endowment for the Arts, will moderate the webinar

·         Gay Hanna, Executive Director, National Center for Creative Aging

·         Nora Super, Director, 2015 White House Conference on Aging

To join the webinar

The webinar takes place on Wednesday, February 3, 2016, 3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. EST. It is free and open to the public. Please register in advance. Media may RSVP to Sally Gifford, NEA Public Affairs Specialist at giffords@arts.gov. You may listen using your computer's speakers or dial-in to 1-877-685-5350 and use participant code: 739587. Attendees will be muted but able to type in questions and comments through a text Q&A box. An archive of the webinar will be available at http://arts.gov/videos/webinars.

 

Follow the conversation @NEAarts and @CreativityAging with the hashtag #CreativeAgeSummit.

 

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creative aging workshops offered to new hampshire teaching artists

Creative Aging programs engage older adults in active arts learning.  Senior service centers, health sites, arts/ community groups and libraries are looking for teaching artists who can design and deliver effective programs for an aging population. The New Hampshire State Council on the Arts and Lifetime Arts are teaming up with two great partner sites in Lebanon and Concord.  Learn about current research on arts and aging, see what’s different about adult learning, analyze best practices, explore how your arts education expertise forms a strong basis for working with older adults.

creative aging . . . tips from our friends in ohio

As we all know, engaging in the arts can be extremely beneficial to our physical, mental, and social health. It is essential to stay creatively engaged in order to develop our minds and maintain cognitive function. However, sometimes when thinking about “developing our minds” we only think of children. What about the elderly?